Hausmann gives $511,000 legal bill to HBDHB

DHB baulks at $511,000 bill from Hausmann – Hawke’s Bay – Dominion Post

The HBDHB has refused to cough a $511,759 legal bill sent by Peter Hausmann.

Mr Hausmann sent the invoice in November last year, claiming legal expenses in relation to the director-general of health’s review of conflict-of-interest allegations.

The invoice, under a Healthcare NZ letterhead, was for services provided by law firm Russell McVeagh.

Mr Hausmann was appointed to the board in June 2005. He is managing director of Healthcare NZ, which was about to bid for a $50 million community health services contract being tendered by the board when he was appointed.

Hausmann has lumbered the DHB with all this grief and then he has the temerity to send them a bill for the grief it caused him when it was him who caused all the conflict in the first place. As further evidence of the Health Minister’s brazen attempt to suppress information reaching the public the HBDHB withdrew yesterday a complaint laid by the sacked board with the office of the ombudsmen. The board had complained that the review panel would not disclose information it had received to reach conclusions on its second draft report.

The Former board members have also paid for this ad to be printed in the local paper that rejects Cunliffe’s and Cullen’s disgusting and unprecedented attack on them and their integrity in the Parliament this week.

The advertisement shows quite clearly that the previously sick, but miraculously recovered CEO Chris Clarke is up to his ears in this shenanigans.

Cunliffe is going to look very, very silly as more and more evidence makes its way around his governments court imposed secrecy. If this scandal erupted in Japan ministers would be committing seppuku, in the UK and there would be mass resignations, anywhere else people would be spending time in a cell with some called Bubba, but not here in little old corrupt Labour governed New Zealand where the best defence money can buy is a Labour Party membership.

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