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Lemmy was the ultimate bachelor. The frontman was never married and he even hated the thought of living with a woman. He once said: "If you move in with someone, you lose all respect for them. All them dirty knickers on the towel rail, all that snorting and farting. Does that appeal to you? Because it doesn't to me. "When you first start dating someone, it's all about being on your best behaviour, and that initial magic. I never wanted the magic to stop." Brilliant.

Lemmy was the ultimate bachelor. The frontman was never married and he even hated the thought of living with a woman. He once said: “If you move in with someone, you lose all respect for them. All them dirty knickers on the towel rail, all that snorting and farting. Does that appeal to you? Because it doesn’t to me. “When you first start dating someone, it’s all about being on your best behaviour, and that initial magic. I never wanted the magic to stop.” Brilliant.

Ian ?Lemmy? Kilmister

1945 -2015

Born to Lose, Lived to Win

Baddest Mother?? of Rock ‘n’ Roll

This is for Nige Baby…

Lemmy was a true hell-raiser and his tales of half a century of hard partying often left interviewers lost for words. Even in his older years he’d hang out in The Rainbow Bar on Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, with a glass of bourbon in one hand and a Marlboro red in the other, wearing his famous cowboy hat and the Iron Cross around his neck. And he sure lived life to the full. So much so, fans were beginning to think he was actually immortal.

He previously admitted he drank a bottle of Jack Daniel’s every day from the age of 30, he took speed for THREE decades, had run ins with the police and was rumoured to have bedded 2,000 women.

Lemmy made the shocking admission about his whisky addiction in the documentary Live Fast Die Old and fans were stunned when he revealed he’d cleaned up his act in 2013 after a health scare.

But he didn’t give up on his unhealthy lifestyle altogether, instead, he cut down on cigarettes and swapped from Jack Daniel’s and coke to vodka and orange – reportedly to help with his diabetes. Although, during an interview his assistant wondered whether swapping from one 40 per cent spirit topped with sugar to another 40 per cent spirit topped with sugar was really going to help.

“I like orange juice better,” Lemmy said. “So, Coca-Cola can f off.”

“I can’t say I was really that surprised when the doctor told me I needed a defibrillator inserted in my chest,” Lemmy Kilmister said?in 2013. “When you’ve lived the life that I have, you should always expect something like that to crop up. I was not a good boy. I’ve had too much fun.”

Gambling is for fools, but that’s the way he liked it: The late Mot?rhead frontman was always willing to deal with the effects of an extreme lifestyle if it meant living his way. He did just that until he became too ill to party like a rock star, and even then continued making music and playing shows nearly right up until the end.

The Nolan Sisters Myth: A story once did the rounds that Lemmy had an orgy with all of the Nolan sisters backstage at Top of the Pops. Despite it sounding like a moment a rock 'n' roll legend would be proud of, Lemmy later laughed off the rumour and insisted the singing siblings turned down his efforts to sleep with them. He said "No (there was no fling), but it wasn't for the want of trying. They are awesome chicks. "We were supposed to be the smelliest, loudest mother ??. in the building [at Top of the Pops] but we more than met our match. We were in awe. You couldn't mess with the Nolan sisters."

The Nolan Sisters Myth: A story once did the rounds that Lemmy had an orgy with all of the Nolan sisters backstage at Top of the Pops. Despite it sounding like a moment a rock ‘n’ roll legend would be proud of, Lemmy later laughed off the rumour and insisted the singing siblings turned down his efforts to sleep with them. He said “No (there was no fling), but it wasn’t for the want of trying. They are awesome chicks. “We were supposed to be the smelliest, loudest mother ??. in the building [at Top of the Pops] but we more than met our match. We were in awe. You couldn’t mess with the Nolan sisters.”

You would hear him before you saw him, the tell-tale clink of ice on glass, a glass that rarely left his right hand. In it, always the same concoction: whisky and Coke. It sore him through the day and kept him ? mercifully, as his entourage down the years will confirm ? mostly nice and manageably mellow. You would smell him next, the moment a roadie opens the door to the soundproofed rehearsal room to wheel out the drum-kit case. It’s an overpowering whiff of nicotine that quickly brings tears to the eyes. And then, through the smoke, you at last see him, sat on a chair, the only static thing in a room full of activity, and you realise it couldn’t ever have been anybody else.

Lemmy, to no one’s great surprise, is not his real name. (It’s a nickname prompted by his early habit of always asking “lend me a fiver?”) He was born Ian Kilmister in Stoke-on-Trent in 1945, the son of a vicar who abandoned him when he was just three months old. He would eventually be reunited with his father 25 years later. “Nasty little weasel,” was his summation. He grew up with his mother on a holiday resort in North Wales, an only child content in his solitude. Except in summer, when the holiday resort burst into life once more. It was here that he found his true calling in life. And it wasn’t music.

“Women,” he clarifies. “Girls always did loom large in my life. Every summer, these families would arrive from places like Manchester for their summer holidays. They’d come for a week, and their daughters were always up for a good time. They kept me,” he cackled, “very busy.”

Lemmy auditioned for space-rock band Hawkwind in August 1971, hoping to land a slot as their second guitarist. During an open-air concert at Powis Square in Notting Hill Gate, their bassist didn't show up, so keyboardist Dik Mik, who liked to score speed with Lemmy, suggested Lemmy play bass. "I'd never played bass in my life!" Lemmy said in his memoir. After joining Hawkwind onstage for the show, vocalist and sax player Nik Turner told him, "Make some noises in E. This is called 'You Shouldn't Do That.'" Lemmy passed the audition and spent the next four years playing bass with the band. Photo: Michael Putland/Getty

Lemmy auditioned for space-rock band Hawkwind in August 1971, hoping to land a slot as their second guitarist. During an open-air concert at Powis Square in Notting Hill Gate, their bassist didn’t show up, so keyboardist Dik Mik, who liked to score speed with Lemmy, suggested Lemmy play bass. “I’d never played bass in my life!” Lemmy said in his memoir. After joining Hawkwind onstage for the show, vocalist and sax player Nik Turner told him, “Make some noises in E. This is called ‘You Shouldn’t Do That.'” Lemmy passed the audition and spent the next four years playing bass with the band. Photo: Michael Putland/Getty

Lemmy began his career in music by reassembling Jimi Hendrix’s pedals after the elder statesman would destroy them each night, by shuffling between front and backstage for the guitar god, and that he loved every precious second of that proximity.

Music, it turns out, was merely his secondary calling, but he pursued it capably. A budding bassist, by 1965 he was playing in a band called the Rocking Vicars, and three years later was a roadie for Jimi Hendrix.

While in the Rocking Vicars, Lemmy hadn’t discovered the thrills of self-indulgence ? but that didn’t stop him from having a few out-of-this-world experiences.

“In 1966 we were coming back over the Yorkshire Moors which, incidentally, was before I even drank beer, so it couldn’t have been some acid flashback.

This thing came over the horizon and stopped dead in the middle of the sky. Then it went from a standstill to top speed, immediately. We don’t even have aircraft that do that now, never mind then. So that was pretty eye-opening for me.”

Lemmy would become a shaman of sleaze and respect in equal measure, but infamously had an early-life mini-career as a roadie for Jimi Hendrix, telling Rolling Stone in 2010: “Whenever they needed an extra pair of hands I was right there. I didn’t get the job for any talent or anything. But I did see Jimi play a lot. Twice a night for about three months…” He went on to explain Hendrix’s courtesy, saying: “Good manners don’t cost nothing.” That attitude, that baseline decency, is just as important to Lemmy’s legacy as his white cowboy boots and black everything else, someone who felt no need to limit their own behaviour but no right to dictate others’, either.

Jimi Hendrix At Woodstock. In his pre-Hawkwind days, Lemmy cut his teeth as part of the road crew for the Jimi Hendrix Experience. "Jimi taught me how to find drugs in the most unlikely places because that was part of my job for him, That's how I learned to function on five hits of acid. But I also learned about theatrics and performing. Jimi was so effortlessly cool and he would move like an elegant spider. He was always interested in the crowd. He made very bad jokes because he was so out of his mind. People couldn't figure out what he was talking about by the time he was finished. But he was certainly the best guitar player you'll ever see, probably ever."

Jimi Hendrix At Woodstock. In his pre-Hawkwind days, Lemmy cut his teeth as part of the road crew for the Jimi Hendrix Experience. “Jimi taught me how to find drugs in the most unlikely places because that was part of my job for him, That’s how I learned to function on five hits of acid. But I also learned about theatrics and performing. Jimi was so effortlessly cool and he would move like an elegant spider. He was always interested in the crowd. He made very bad jokes because he was so out of his mind. People couldn’t figure out what he was talking about by the time he was finished. But he was certainly the best guitar player you’ll ever see, probably ever.”

By 1971, he was installed as a member of the psychedelic rock act Hawkwind, and was by now preceded by his reputation: a speed freak whose appetite for the drug shocked (and impressed) everyone he knew. Well, not quite everyone.

Lemmy always seemed slightly out of place as a member of Hawkwind, but his contributions were excellent. He wrote and sang the meditative, spare, and acoustic ?The Watcher? from 1972?s Doremi Fasol Latido, and it?s shocking to contemplate its sound in terms of Lemmy?s later career.

During his time with Hawkwind he developed an appetite for amphetamines and LSD, particularly the former. Before joining Hawkwind, he recalled Dik Mik, a former Hawkwind sound technician, visiting his squat in the middle of the night and taking speed with him. They became interested in how long “you could make the human body jump about without stopping”, which they did for a few months, until Mik ran out of money and wanted to return to Hawkwind, taking Lemmy with him.

?I first got into speed because it was a utilitarian drug and kept you awake when you needed to be awake, when otherwise you’d just be flat out on your back. If you drive to Glasgow for nine hours in the back of a sweaty truck you don’t really feel like going onstage feeling all bright and breezy … It’s the only drug I’ve found that I can get on with, and I’ve tried them all ? except smack [heroin] and morphine: I’ve never “fixed” anything.?

After being busted on the Canadian border for possession, he was sacked by Hawkwind. No matter ?

When he finally started a new band, he reworked a Hawkwind song he?d written called ?Mot?rhead?, stripping it back from Hawkwind?s more arch arrangements to keep it fast, loud, and simple. In the song ?Overkill?, there?s a line about how it?s important to ?feel it in your guts??to let the music hit you in the spine and force you to move. It?s almost like a mission statement?they?re actively trying to whip you into a frenzy with this galloping, triumphant, and aggressive music. Like the Ramones, Mot?rhead had a formula. Their music served as a bridge between the metalheads and the punks, pushing kids to play their own music faster, heavier, and louder.

In May 1975, Lemmy was busted at the Toronto border with a gram of amphetamine sulfate down his pants. He spent a night in jail and then received a combination of good and bad news. "The police charged me for cocaine and I really had amphetamines," said Lemmy. "It was a wrongful charge so they had to let me go." However, even though he returned to Hawkwind the next day, the band kicked him out after their next show. "If I was busted for acid, everything would have been fine," he said. "But they were all about the psychedelic experience. The most cosmic band in the world fired me for getting busted with the wrong kinds of drugs!" Photo: Getty Images

In May 1975, Lemmy was busted at the Toronto border with a gram of amphetamine sulfate down his pants. He spent a night in jail and then received a combination of good and bad news. “The police charged me for cocaine and I really had amphetamines,” said Lemmy. “It was a wrongful charge so they had to let me go.” However, even though he returned to Hawkwind the next day, the band kicked him out after their next show. “If I was busted for acid, everything would have been fine,” he said. “But they were all about the psychedelic experience. The most cosmic band in the world fired me for getting busted with the wrong kinds of drugs!”?Photo: Getty Images

Four years later after leaving Hawkwind, he formed Mot?rhead, which became the heaviest metal band of them all.

“We were not heavy metal, We were a rock’n’roll band. Still are. Everyone always describes us as heavy metal even when I tell them otherwise. Why won’t people listen?”

Mot?rhead came into their own in the early 1980s. They were huge. “Ace of Spades” was their biggest hit, and if it sounded fast and loud and lethal back in 1981, it still does today. They toured off the back of its success endlessly, and released dozens of albums. But by the decade’s end, they were effectively washed up, suddenly deemed yesterday’s men, their time over.

“I never had very good managers,” he says, claiming to have been left practically penniless. The band had difficulty booking UK tours, and no longer had a record deal. The singer, disconsolate, moved to Los Angeles, not so much to start again as simply to escape. “I had about ?500 left in the bank,” he reflects. “I thought that that was the end for me.”

Any number of old rockers shore up in Los Angeles, awaiting either inglorious death or remarkable revival. Lemmy revived. “Suddenly, we were this foreign band,” he says, grinning, “and that had a kind of appeal.” Newer acts also started to revere him as a kind of godfather, an icon, his hedonistic lifestyle the one they wished to emulate. “Icon? F that. Makes me sound like a 500-year-old religious painting. I had no time for that. I wanted to still be current.”

By 1995, they were. Mot?rhead had a new line-up and, at last, a manager Lemmy respected. Finally, he was getting his dues. “That was a novelty,” he says. “I liked it.”

But if his career was back on track, his private life was still perennially off the rails. The one-night stands may never have dried up, but the man who frequently boasted to bedding more than 1,000 women couldn’t find one to settle down with. ‘

Lemmy was asked what he was looking for during his endless conquests. Love?

“Doesn’t everybody?” he asked witheringly. “But falling in love is terrible. It makes you act foolish, like an idiot. You sign your life over when you fall in love, and it’s awful, it’s torture. You end up walking past their house at night and looking up longingly at their window… Who wants to live like that?”

He is speaking, it was suggested, like someone who has had his heart broken. “Oh, many times,” he sighed. “Women always left me because I wouldn’t commit, but then nothing changes a relationship like commitment. If you move in with someone, you lose all respect for them.” How so? “All them dirty knickers on the towel rail, all that snorting and farting. Does that appeal to you? Because it doesn’t to me. When you first start dating someone, it’s all about being on your best behaviour, and that initial magic. I never wanted the magic to stop.”

But presumably he got lonely, at an age when many seek the comfort and solace of family. He has, as he put it, “two-and-a-half” children from his various relationships, one of whom, a son, is a record producer in Los Angeles whom he sees once in a while. But otherwise, between tours, he retreats to his two-bedroom apartment in West Hollywood alone.

“So what? I’ve always been alone. I grew up alone. I like it that way. Even when I’m in an arena surrounded by 10,000 people, I’m alone in my head. It’s a state of mind, isn’t it?” He insists that, even at home, he rarely seeks out company, “though I do go to bars at night”. At these, he sees a few familiar faces in each, and he does have one particular friend, Scotty, whom he regularly meets for drinks at LA’s infamous Rainbow.

“But that won’t last for very much longer,” he said. Scotty, he explains, is engaged to be married. “And so that will be him gone ? for a couple of years at least, until the novelty wears out, heh heh.”

And now he drifts helplessly back on to the subject of women, and the bond he never managed to form with any of them. “It’s funny, isn’t it? You fall in love with someone and then they try to turn you into somebody else. Why do they do that?”

There was a period in the late Seventies when audiences at punk rock shows in England showed their appreciation by spitting at the bands onstage, or "gobbing." Mot?rhead, a favourite band of the punkers, were sometimes on the receiving end of phlegm showers. "I never liked it, but we accepted we couldn't stop it," Lemmy told Inked. "One time I saw a guy spit a big green thing on my arm and I borrowed a line from Winston Churchill. I pulled it off my arm and rubbed it in my hair and said, 'See that? Tonight I'll have a shower and I'll be clean, but tomorrow you'll still be a stinking a..hole.'"

There was a period in the late Seventies when audiences at punk rock shows in England showed their appreciation by spitting at the bands onstage, or “gobbing.” Mot?rhead, a favourite band of the punkers, were sometimes on the receiving end of phlegm showers. “I never liked it, but we accepted we couldn’t stop it,” Lemmy told Inked. “One time I saw a guy spit a big green thing on my arm and I borrowed a line from Winston Churchill. I pulled it off my arm and rubbed it in my hair and said, ‘See that? Tonight I’ll have a shower and I’ll be clean, but tomorrow you’ll still be a stinking a..hole.'”

Shortly before beginning rehearsals for the landmark 1980 Mot?rhead album Ace of Spades, Lemmy collapsed backstage after a show at Stafford Bingley Hall and had to be revived for the encore. In his memoir, he says he told the press that he was exhausted from receiving three blowies earlier that afternoon. "That was true, actually," he said. "There were chicks all over the place, and there was this really cute Indian bird ? she was two of them."

Shortly before beginning rehearsals for the landmark 1980 Mot?rhead album Ace of Spades, Lemmy collapsed backstage after a show at Stafford Bingley Hall and had to be revived for the encore. In his memoir, he says he told the press that he was exhausted from receiving three blowies earlier that afternoon. “That was true, actually,” he said. “There were chicks all over the place, and there was this really cute Indian bird ? she was two of them.”

Lemmy did speed for 30 years and once took a whole bag of the stuff, along with tranquilizers, to stop the police from confiscated them.

Talking about how he never went ‘crazy’ from speed, he said: “It takes concentration and willingness to experiment. Each to his own, you know? What’s normal for me isn’t normal for everyone. You need to find your drug of choice and stick with that.”

With regards to the war on drugs, he also said the Government should give up because “the war has been lost.”

He said: “There are more drugs now than before the war started.

“You have to regulate drugs. You can’t just let people do what they want. You have to make sure the drug is pure and make sure they don’t cause other problems. It makes sense to regulate.”

After three days spent taking Dexedrine with Dik Mik, Lemmy and his bandmate took Mandrax, a depressant, to lessen the intensity of the high. But Lemmy got bored, so he dropped acid and mescaline, then took more Mandrax. Dik Mak drove to the venue, where they pair partook in cocaine and eight Black Beauties (uppers) each. "f' hell, Mik, I can't move," Lemmy said. "Can you?" As he explained in his book, the band's roadies helped them onstage for the show, which was taped for the Greasy Truckers Party live album "That was one of the best gigs we ever taped," Lemmy enthused. "The jamming between me and [leader Dave] Brock was great. We got 'Silver Machine,' our only hit ? and Number Two at that ? from that gig!"

After three days spent taking Dexedrine with Dik Mik, Lemmy and his bandmate took Mandrax, a depressant, to lessen the intensity of the high. But Lemmy got bored, so he dropped acid and mescaline, then took more Mandrax. Dik Mak drove to the venue, where they pair partook in cocaine and eight Black Beauties (uppers) each. “f’ hell, Mik, I can’t move,” Lemmy said. “Can you?” As he explained in his book, the band’s roadies helped them onstage for the show, which was taped for the Greasy Truckers Party live album “That was one of the best gigs we ever taped,” Lemmy enthused. “The jamming between me and [leader Dave] Brock was great. We got ‘Silver Machine,’ our only hit ? and Number Two at that ? from that gig!”

Lemmy had a penchant for Nazi memorabilia (he insisted that his collection came from a place of historical interest, not ideological fascination) and wrote leagues of scumbag lyrics, but Lemmy wasn?t merely loved?he was adored. The wrestler Triple H, who has three different entrance themes sung by Lemmy, told a story about how he once saw Slash ?starstruck? in the presence of his hero. Fans would make pilgrimages from all over the world to Los Angeles? Rainbow Bar on the off chance that he?d be playing the game machine at the end of the bar. People love telling Lemmy stories, and there are a lot of them out there.

CAUTION

Lemmy’s Funniest Ever Story


The following feature may contain references to sex, drugs and rock ?n? roll. Oh, and some bad language too.

As told by Lemmy
Mot?rhead

[Ian Fraser ?Lemmy? Kilmister]

The best story I ever heard, and I believe it sure, it sounds like Ritchie. Ritchie Blackmore is notorious right, for doing terrible things to people obviously. And this tour manager one time pissed him off and then slipped him a Mickey.

[Slipping someone a Mickey. A slang term for giving someone a drink laced with drugs without their prior knowledge or consent.]

[Lemmy Kilmister:]
Right and he woke up stark naked without any clothes or papers of any kind and a hired car with no keys in it, on a fairy to Iceland. And I don?t care who you are; that is the best I ever heard, that is furore, you know.

And I hope it?s true, you know, because it should be, that is wonderful and it?s malice and what you are going to do, ask the sailor for help, or wait till all the cars start going beep beep beep behind you when they get into the port yeah, Wunderbar stark butt naked excellent?

"One cool thing happened in the Seventies when a chick just climbed up [onstage] and blew me," Lemmy told Inked. "I was singing ? well, I couldn't stop, could I?"

“One cool thing happened in the Seventies when a chick just climbed up [onstage] and blew me,” Lemmy told Inked. “I was singing ? well, I couldn’t stop, could I?”

Lemmy Kilmister was a hit with women ... The 'sex legend' nickname: Lemmy might not have bedded a Nolan sister but he definitely did have romp with a LOT of women and was nicknamed a 'sex legend'. It was once reported he bedded 2,000 girls during his career with Motorhead and former band Hawkwind but he later said it was half that amount - still, that's a lot of sex. "Girls always did loom large in my life," he once said. "Every summer, these families would arrive from places like Manchester for their summer holidays."They'd come for a week, and their daughters were always up for a good time. They kept me very busy."

Lemmy Kilmister was a hit with women … The ‘sex legend’ nickname: Lemmy might not have bedded a Nolan sister but he definitely did have romp with a LOT of women and was nicknamed a ‘sex legend’. It was once reported he bedded 2,000 girls during his career with Motorhead and former band Hawkwind but he later said it was half that amount – still, that’s a lot of sex. “Girls always did loom large in my life,” he once said. “Every summer, these families would arrive from places like Manchester for their summer holidays.”They’d come for a week, and their daughters were always up for a good time. They kept me very busy.”

Lemmy and a friend were in a car splitting up 100 blue pills ? a mixture of speed and downers ? when a police cruiser pulled up to them. The tweakers stuffed the pills into their mouths to get rid of the evidence, and the cops were unable to find any contraband. That night, when Lemmy fell asleep, his heart rate and breathing slowed precipitously. "It looked like I had stopped breathing although I hadn't," he said in White Line Fever. "I was lying there with both eyes open [and] having kind of a hard time speaking." At least two people with him thought had died until they figured out he was still breathing.

Lemmy and a friend were in a car splitting up 100 blue pills ? a mixture of speed and downers ? when a police cruiser pulled up to them. The tweakers stuffed the pills into their mouths to get rid of the evidence, and the cops were unable to find any contraband. That night, when Lemmy fell asleep, his heart rate and breathing slowed precipitously. “It looked like I had stopped breathing although I hadn’t,” he said in White Line Fever. “I was lying there with both eyes open [and] having kind of a hard time speaking.” At least two people with him thought had died until they figured out he was still breathing.

Mot?rhead were well known in the rock world not only for playing hard as hell but for being loud to the point of giving their audiences brain damage. Even from the side of the stage, it was a battering experience. Lemmy?s lyrics, often witty, packed with sarcasm and scorn, told a lot of unflinching truth. With Lem, it wasn?t always what he saw but how he saw it that made the lyrics bite.

Motorhead Roadie Steve Luna Opens Up on Lemmy story:

?It’s December 5th, 2012, around 9PM at the Velodrom in Berlin. You can hear the crowd chanting “Motorhead, Motorhead!”?We’re in the dressing room backstage and Lemmy is lying on the couch, not feeling well. The tour manager, Eddie [Rocha] comes in and asks if he is going to play. I can’t give him a definite answer. I tap Lem on the shoulder to see if we are going to cancel or if he’s going to go up and play tonight. He says “I don’t know if I can do it tonight.”?I don’t know if he was sick, tired… but I didn’t think he was going to be able to play.?I look at Eddie, and we both look down at him, trying to figure out what to do. It’s about 9:15PM now — ?we were supposed to be on stage 10 minutes ago. At this point you could hear the crowd pounding their feet on the ground, and then they all started chanting “Lemmy, Lemmy, Lemmy.” ?It was at that moment that Lem stood up, looked at himself in the mirror, combed his hair, fixed his shirt & said: “Let’s do it.”

Lemmy & Motorhead gave it their all that night, and the fans loved him for it — that’s the Lemmy I will always remember. Lemmy will forever represent rock and roll to me. He lived and breathed it, and showed me what it was?all?about. It was an honor and privilege to work with Ian “Lemmy” Kilmister, just as he was once honoured to work with Jimi Hendrix!?

Mot?rhead: the Guts and the Gl?ry (D?cumentary)

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhTDbVecHSM]

“In your twenties, you think you are immortal,” Lemmy said. “In your thirties, you hope you are immortal. In your forties, you just pray it doesn’t hurt too much, and by the time you reach my age, you become convinced that, well, it could be just around the corner. Do I think about death a lot? It’s difficult not to when you’re 65, son.”

In 1983, Anvil frontman Lips was invited to hang out with Lemmy on tour for what he thought was a little bit of drinking. Which is weird, considering “a little bit of drinking” and “Lemmy” don’t seem like they belong in the same sentence in the first place, but we all make mistakes. Lips recalls the story in a recent interview with The Rockpit, though it’s actually incredible he remembers any of this at all.

“Probably in 1983, while we were on tour with him, he invited me up to his hotel room, and he says, ‘Come up and have a couple of drinks.’ So I said, ‘Sure, man. F great!’ So we sat down and he pulled out a forty-ounce bottle of vodka and a couple of crates of orange juice and these big tall glasses that probably hold twenty ounces of fluid. So he fills it up with about ten ounces of vodka and then tops it off with orange juice, and then we start drinking. Of course, I get about three or four shots in, and I’m f wasted because I’m not a drinker. So he goes, ‘You’re starting to look a little buzzed there, Lips.’ So he pulls out a little leather pouch and a pocket knife and dips his pocket knife into this white powder, and it’s f amphetamines; it’s f speed. And he sticks it right under my nose and he goes, ‘F sniff, right!’ And it’s like [I consumed] no alcohol. I’m straight as a f judge! ‘Wow! Okay, this is cool!’ We keep going and keep going, and the next thing I know, there’s a knock on the f door and it’s the tour manager. And he goes, ‘Time to go to the gig, guys.’ And it was supposed to be our day off. And I’m, like, ‘We’re on our day off. What do you mean go to the gig?’ And he goes, ‘Guys, you’ve been sitting in here for 24 f hours. Get your crap together and let’s go!’ ‘What happened?’ [Laughs] So I get to the gig and I can barely f walk, I’m so f up. And Lemmy walks in and takes a look at me and goes, ‘You’re looking f knackered, mate. Maybe you oughta try one of these.’ He pulls out a little plastic bag and it’s filled with little black capsules, and he says, ‘These are called black bombers. Take two.’ And I go, ‘You know what, Lemmy? After last night, I’m only taking one!’ Well I ate the pill, and f, I did the gig! I could have done five! [Laughs] All my hair stood on end. And I go, ‘Holy f!'”

In 1969, before Lemmy joined Hawkwind, a friend convinced his nurse girlfriend to sneak them some amphetamine sulfate from the dispensary where she worked. She accidentally brought home a jar of atropine sulfate. Lemmy did a teaspoon full, which he said was "200 times the overdose," and then everyone "went berserk." In his memoir White Line Fever he recalled talking to a TV held under his arm, then passing out and waking up in the hospital. "If we got you in another hour you would have been dead," the doctor told him. Even after being treated, he had sporadic hallucinations for two weeks and recalled, "sitting, reading a book, and I'd turn to page 42 ? but there was no book."

In 1969, before Lemmy joined Hawkwind, a friend convinced his nurse girlfriend to sneak them some amphetamine sulfate from the dispensary where she worked. She accidentally brought home a jar of atropine sulfate. Lemmy did a teaspoon full, which he said was “200 times the overdose,” and then everyone “went berserk.” In his memoir White Line Fever he recalled talking to a TV held under his arm, then passing out and waking up in the hospital. “If we got you in another hour you would have been dead,” the doctor told him. Even after being treated, he had sporadic hallucinations for two weeks and recalled, “sitting, reading a book, and I’d turn to page 42 ? but there was no book.”

On December 28, 2015, the world of rock ?n? roll was dealt a devastating blow when Mot?rhead?s Ian Kilmister, better known simply as ?Lemmy,? passed away suddenly just four days after his 70th birthday and two days after being diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer. Since then, the heavy metal world has erupted with ideas for how to best commemorate the very, very beloved, hard-partying legend.

Some are gunning to have a newly discovered element?a ?heavy metal,? fittingly?named ?Lemmium? added to the periodic table, while others are just listening to ?Ace of Spades? with such frequency in the wake of our collective loss that they?ve catapulted it onto the contemporary Billboard charts. (It was released 36 years ago.)

But perhaps one of the most fitting tributes to the booze- and speed-loving rock god would be to name a drink in his honour. And what better cocktail to make eponymous to Lemmy than his very favorite, a Jack and Coke?

A Change.org petition?has been launched that implores ?everyone to henceforth and hereafter refer to the combination of Jack Daniels Whiskey and Coca-Cola as a ?Lemmy.’?

?A Jack Daniels and Coke will forever be associated with Ian Fraser ?Lemmy? Kilmister, the iconic founder of Motorhead,? the petition states, with the intention of??to celebrate and remember one of Rock and Roll?s true legends.? As of press time, more than 45,537 people had signed the petition, which, if ?passed,? would be enforced by ?The Entire World.?

Lemmy Kilmister funeral. He would never retire Lemmy gigged with Motorhead up until his final years and refused to retire. Asked if he would ever slow down, he laughed and responded: "Can't see that happening, can you?" Lemmy then said: "This is how my life was always meant to take place: in the back of a tour bus somewhere, a girl I've never met before in my lap, and who will be gone by morning. It's how I live. It suits me."

Lemmy Kilmister funeral. He would never retire Lemmy gigged with Motorhead up until his final years and refused to retire.?Asked if he would ever slow down, he laughed and responded: “Can’t see that happening, can you?” Lemmy then said: “This is how my life was always meant to take place: in the back of a tour bus somewhere, a girl I’ve never met before in my lap, and who will be gone by morning. It’s how I live. It suits me.”

Tributes for Mot?rhead's Lemmy Kilmister are laid at the Rainbow Bar and Grill in Los Angeles. Splash News

Tributes for Mot?rhead’s Lemmy Kilmister are laid at the Rainbow Bar and Grill in Los Angeles. Splash News

Mot?rhead: Live Fast Die ?ld (D?cumentary)

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYuSJacb7H0]

There?s an unfillable void left in his wake. The man was a true original. Nobody has Lemmy?s voice?that loosely melodic subterranean growl was perfectly suited to songs about chasing girls and getting jam-packed out of it, night after night on the road. Even the way he positioned himself in front of a microphone?neck craned back, facing upwards?was unique. There are many great bassists in the world, but nobody has Lemmy?s precise combination of tone, technique, and power. With his sunglasses, handlebar moustache, and bullet belt, he sang from a position of rebellion and strength. Mot?rhead?s was biker gang, street fighting, and war music?you put it on when you want to feel like you?re in control.

Lemmy Kilmister was one of rock?n?roll?s all-time underdogs.

?Born to lose, live to win,? read his Ace of Spades tattoo, and he clearly lived that mantra. He was expelled from school because he beat his headmaster with a cane. He got a job as a roadie for Hendrix where his duties mostly involved scoring drugs. An outcast, an outsider, and by no means a pretty boy (more like a greasy swampman), he partied hard. That?s the cocktail that made Mot?rhead such a vital band?their dirtbag lyrics were being sung by a real-life deviant party monster. He was the spirit animal encouraging you to live to win, to do whatever it takes to enjoy life, and to fight everyone who tries to interfere.

RIP Lemmy.?Born to lose, lived to win.

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Anthrax Talk Touring With Motorhead, Lemmy Kilmister Stories

Rock legend Lemmy Kilmister’s 7 most hell-raising moments of all time …

Henry Rollins: You Can’t Tell the Story of Rock & Roll Without Lemmy

Motorhead Roadie Steve Luna Opens Up on Lemmy, Himself a …

Lemmy Kilmister lived the ultimate 70 years of sex, drugs and rock and …

Inside Lemmy’s Last Days – Rolling Stone

The Official Mot?rhead Website

Lemmy dead: Mot?rhead frontman Ian Fraser Kilmister dies aged 70 …

Mot?rhead Founder Lemmy Dies at 70 – The Atlantic

Live to Win: The Legacy of Lemmy Kilmister | Pitchfork

Ozzy Osbourne Remembers Lemmy: ‘He Was My Hero’ – Rolling Stone

Lemmy Kilmister’s Wildest Escapades: 15 Insane Tales – Rolling Stone

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