Not the fisting they were hoping for

It?s conventional wisdom for the screeching misandrists of Third-Wave feminism that domestic violence is entirely the preserve of neanderthal, brutish males and their ‘toxic masculinity’. Men, their argument goes, are uniquely prone to violence against their partners.

If this were true, then it would logically follow that lesbian relationships should be, if not violence-free, then at the very least far less violent than heterosexual relationships. Gay male relationships, on the other hand, should be exceptionally violent: after all, they are entirely composed of toxic males.

As it happens, several studies have examined exactly this data ? so what do they say? Quote:

The National Violence Against Women survey found that 21.5 percent of men and 35.4 percent of women living with a same-sex partner experienced intimate-partner physical violence in their lifetimes, compared with 7.1 percent and 20.4 percent for men and women, respectively, with a history of only opposite-sex cohabitation. Transgender respondents had an incidence of 34.6 percent over a lifetime according to a Massachusetts survey. End of quote.

Compare that to rates for heterosexual couples: both the CDC in America and Australia?s ABS report that just 9% ?have been subject to violence by a partner since the age of 15?. I would cautiously note that the data refers to ?all people? in relationships. Granted, those will probably include some homosexual couples, but considering firstly that the data does not specify sexual orientation, and secondly that homosexual couples are a minority, it seems reasonable to procede on the assumption that it is representative of heterosexual couples. Feel free to disagree, of course.

That means that while gay male relationships are indeed distressingly over-represented (250% more than heterosexuals), the data on lesbian couples is truly shocking: lesbian couples are four times more likely to experience domestic violence than heterosexuals. Quote:

The CDC?s 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, released again in 2013 with new analysis, reports in its first-ever study focusing on victimization by sexual orientation that the lifetime prevalence of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner was 43.8 percent for lesbians, 61.1 percent for bisexual women, and 35 percent for heterosexual women, while it was 26 percent for gay men, 37.3 percent for bisexual men, and 29 percent for heterosexual men (this study did not include gender identity or expression). End of quote.

Some studies suggest even more alarmingly rates of abuse by women against their partners. Waldner-Haugrud, Gratch, & Magruder (1997) found that ?that 47.5% of lesbians and 29.7% of gays have been victimized by a same-sex partner. Further, lesbians reported an overall perpetration rate of 38% compared to 21.8% for gay men?.

‘Toxic femininity‘ also seems to be far more insidious than its male variety: ?lesbians reported experiencing a greater number of different victimization and perpetration tactics than gay men?.

So what does all this prove? Firstly, that the narrative pushed relentlessly by generously-funded lobby groups and corporations like Gillette, that domestic violence is solely due to ‘toxic masculinity’, is completely false. Quote:

These studies refute the myths that only straight women get battered, that men are never victims, and that women never batter ? in other words, that domestic violence is not an LGBT issue. In fact, it is one of our most serious health risks, affecting significant numbers within our communities. End of quote.

It also indicates that the LGBT ‘community’ is drawing the same cloak of silence around its problems that once characterised domestic violence in general. Quote:

Myths about domestic violence, victims? fear and shame, a silence that stems from a desire not to harm perceptions of the LGBT community ? all these together contribute to making the problem invisible to others. Many people who are suffering either don?t realize that they?re in a terrible situation or don?t know where to go or who to tell. They wonder who will listen, who will believe them. End of quote.

advocate

So the next time grumpy, dumpy Hannah Gadsby starts wagging her pudgy finger at men, she needs to be told to shut her gob until her fellow lesbians get their own backyard in order.

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