We need factual & impartial NZ history

October 31 1863 Illustrated London News: MEETING OF SETTLERS AND MAORIS AT HAWKE’S BAY, NEW ZEALAND.

Hobson’s Pledge Trust

History teachers behind a new petition say too few Kiwis understand what brought the Crown and Maori together in the 1840 Treaty, or how their relationship developed since because schools are not required to teach it.

The New Zealand History Teachers’ Association chair Graeme Ball said New Zealand’s colonial history was taught in an “ad hoc” fashion, and students were “lucky” if they learned about Parihaka, the New Zealand Land Wars, or the Waitangi Tribunal.

He said that the significance, interpretation and application of the Treaty of Waitangi are enshrined in the national curriculum, but only one part ? an achievement objective in Level 5 Social Science, usually applicable to year 10 students ? focuses on how the Treaty has been “responded to”.

“History is an optional subject from year 11. Immediately, we lose 80 per cent of students and then most teachers who are teaching our shared past aren’t doing that until year 13,? Mr Ball said.

We say that impartial, factual history of New Zealand is needed in the national curriculum to replace the white guilt indoctrination that tends to appear.

Stuff

An impartial teaching of our history at school could be like ?heritage? markers at historic sites around the country giving brief, factual records of what happened.

The fact that the petitioning history teachers appear to focus on Parihaka, the land wars, and the Waitangi Tribunal instead of the full panorama of our past shows that getting a factual, impartial history may be difficult.

Magic Talk host Sean Plunket hit the nail on the head when he said, “I don’t want to learn a bunch of propaganda that says the Treaty is a fraud, whities go home, I’ve been oppressed.”

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