Word of the day

The word for today is…

inexorable (adj) – 1. Impossible to stop, alter, or resist; inevitable: an inexorable fate.
2. Not capable of being persuaded by entreaty; relentless.

Source : The Free Dictionary

Etymology : The Latin antecedent of inexorable is inexorabilis, which is itself a combination of the prefix in-, meaning “not,” plus exorabilis, meaning “pliant” or “capable of being moved by entreaty.” It’s a fitting etymology for inexorable. You can beseech and implore until you’re blue in the face, but that won’t have any effect on something that’s inexorable. Inexorable has been a part of the English language since the 1500s. Originally, it was often applied to people or sometimes to personified things, as in “deaf and inexorable laws.” These days, it is usually applied to things, as in “inexorable monotony” or “an inexorable trend.” In such cases, it essentially means “unyielding” or “inflexible.”

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