Did Morrison win, or did Shorten lose?

Patriot Realm
by John W

Yes, against all predictions, Scott Morrison pulled off the impossible. He won the election. People who had a hunch he might win, and placed bets, cleaned up. The odds were good … bookmakers were certain he could not win. One bookmaker paid out before the election, so convinced were they he had no chance. They won’t be doing that again.

To what extent do we give Morrison credit? This seemingly decent but largely unknown bloke who makes no waves, rocks no boats, says nothing controversial… in fact says nothing at all of any substance on anything… to what extent do we give him credit for his win?

Context is important here. His political opponents terrified thinking Australians. Even football soaked Aussies who glaze over at the mere mention of politics picked up that there was a lunatic in their midst. Of course, that lunatic was Shorten.

Shorten’s minders tried very hard to contain his known foot in mouth disease. Even so, he at times did himself considerable harm, as when he authoritatively maintained that electric cars can be recharged in eight minutes. This was just the ammunition firebrand Alan Jones needed to shake sleeping Australians awake and he did just that.

So we had mild-mannered, steady as she goes ‘Scomo’ and lunatic, high spending, impractical Shorten.

A stark contrast. Chalk and cheese.

There was only one way voters could gravitate, and this is exactly what happened. The question is – were voters running to ‘Scomo’ or running away from Shorten? Were voters truly inspired by the man with the Clark Kent demeanour, or just very aware that the other guy was not across his own policies, was avoiding heavy interviews, was obsessed with wind, solar and electric cars and most definitely would lower the drawbridge to thousands of country shoppers?

Was it inspiration or fear? Was Scomo’s win deserved or was he just lucky he had no credible opposition? In fact, shouldn’t he have won in a landslide given how incompetent his opponents were?

Another context was the mess Labor made when last in power. People remember the Rudd, Gillard, Rudd instability. This memory hangs over Labor.

So Scott Morrison got over the line. You could feel the great relief across Australia. Callers to talkback sounded as though they had just awoken from a bad dream, and they had. They had been facing the prospect of Shorten, Wong, Plibersek and other shredders changing Australia into something unrecognizable.

Yes, we escaped a bullet, but for the future is this man, currently affectionately known as ‘Scomo’, made of the right stuff? There is no evidence to suggest he is. He became a household name when a minister, for stopping the boats. He was given great credit for this, but some strongly believe much of this credit belongs to the experienced military strategist, Jim Molan, who behind the scenes was very much the architect of this very successful operation.

It is vital we are led by a man of great vision, wisdom and strength, who will not shy away or hide from the very tough decisions that await.

We are in a world where there is massive leftist pressure on all to conform to the Left way, leaders and civilians alike. Can Morrison see this? Does he understand this? Has he the strength to say no when leftist pressure builds like a tidal wave threatening our country in so many ways?

Is he, deeply within, rock solid, or a weak man whose weakness was in fact what got him over the line in the election? Weakness that was wrongly read as stability, as a safe harbour in which to shelter from Shorten and his windmills? Will he prove to be safe in the future when great strength and decisiveness will be vital to keep Australia out of trouble? Will he stop the onslaught of leftism that is chewing up many once great countries overseas?

If he is not mighty in his very soul, and deeply wise, he will not be able to climb the very tall mountain before him.

There is zero evidence to suggest he is truly made of the right stuff. He is a man of deafening silence on pretty much every concern Australians have for the country they love.

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