bank robberies

Photo of the Day

Baader-Meinhof bomb builder, Dierk Hoff’s most infamous creation: The Baby Bomb. In 1972, Hoff built the so-called “baby bomb”. The construction consisted of a steel container, which a woman could strap on. The container looked like the belly of a pregnant woman. After the supposedly pregnant woman had placed the bomb, she could inflate a balloon, which in turn simulated a fat belly.?

Baader-Meinhof: In Love with Terror?

In October 1977, the leadership of the German left wing terrorist group Baader-Meinhof, died in a German high-security prison. Their apparent suicides hailed the end of a long and bloody struggle to start a revolution in one of the world?s richest democracies.

During the years of 1968-1977 Germany lived in fear. Three terrorist groups ? the Red Army Faction (RAF), Movement 2 June, and the Revolutionary Cells (RZ) ? gathered about a hundred Germans as their members.

The Baader-Meinhof Gang, who called themselves the Red Army Faction, and two other terrorist groups went killing dozens of people. In 1968 the prominent German journalist Ulrike Meinhof joined the former juvenile delinquent Andreas Baader and his girlfriend Gudrun Ensslin in launching the most terrifying era in German postwar history.

It was the 1967 killing by police of a young activist during a demonstration in Berlin against a visit by the Shah of Iran that apparently persuaded Andreas Baader that the post-war authorities were little better than that which they had replaced.

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Machine Gun Kelly being led by United States Marshals to prison following his conviction.

Machine Gun Kelly being led by United States Marshalls to prison following his conviction.

Kathryn and ?Machine Gun? Kelly

Kathryn Kelly made a career out of crime. With a lust for danger, she masterminded crimes that took Kathryn, her husband and others, who included her own mother and stepfather, on a spree across Minnesota, Tennessee, Oklahoma and Texas. Starting off with small crimes including bootlegging and smuggling liquor onto an Oklahoma Indian reservation and other petty crimes, she got her husband, George Barnes aka George Kelly, to?move up to more serious criminal activity, eventually escalating into bank robberies, kidnapping and extortion.

Kathryn was given the same birth name as Cleo Epps, queen of the Tulsa bootleggers, she who was pitched into the dank darkness of a west-side cistern after asking why she had to die. Cleo Mae Brooks didn?t like that name and became Kathryn in eighth grade to seem more elegant.

And eventually, it worked.

But she started small in 1904 near Saltillo, Mississippi, eight years before Elvis Presley?s mother was born there. After becoming Kathryn, she married at fifteen, divorced after her daughter Pauline was born and moved with her parents, James and Ora (Coleman) Brooks, from Mississippi to Oklahoma, where she was briefly married again.

Kathryn?s mother Ora divorced Brooks, married Robert G. ?Boss? Shannon, and moved with Kathryn and Pauline to his place near Palestine, Texas, north of Fort Worth. He was in the hospitality business, catering to gangsters; his rate was fifty dollars a night.

Kathryn?s ticket out of that stark, weather-beaten?farmhouse was her third marriage; this time the groom was Texas bootlegger Charlie Thorne.

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Photo of the Day

The blast killed 168 people, including 19 children, injured hundreds more and caused hundreds of millions of dollars in damage to structures and vehicles in the downtown area. Photo AP.

The bomb killed 168 people, including 19 children, injured hundreds more and caused hundreds of millions of dollars in damage to structures and vehicles in the downtown area. Photo AP.

The Oklahoma City Bombing

On April 19, 1995, around 9:03 a.m., just after parents dropped their children off at day care at the Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City, the unthinkable happened.

A massive bomb inside a rental truck exploded, blowing half of the nine-story building into oblivion. A stunned nation watched as the bodies of men, women, and children were pulled from the rubble for nearly two weeks.

When the smoke cleared and the exhausted rescue workers packed up and left, 168 people were dead.

Prosecutor Joseph Hartzler began his opening statement in the Timothy McVeigh trial by reminding the jury of the terror and the heartbreak:? “Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, April 19th, 1995, was a beautiful day in Oklahoma City — at least it started out as a beautiful day. The sun was shining. Flowers were blooming. It was springtime in Oklahoma City.

Sometime after six o’clock that morning, Tevin Garrett’s mother woke him up to get him ready for the day. He was only 16 months old. He was a toddler; and as some of you know that have experience with toddlers, he had a keen eye for mischief. He would often pull on the cord of her curling iron in the morning, pull it off the counter top until it fell down, often till it fell down on him. That morning, she picked him up and wrestled with him on her bed before she got him dressed. She remembers this morning because that was the last morning of his life….”

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Photo Of The Day

Sandeep Kaur, The Bombshell Bandit. "Tick Tock. I have a bomb"

Sandeep Kaur, The Bombshell Bandit. “Tick Tock. I have a bomb”

From Nurse to Bank Robber

The Bombshell Bandit

“Tick tock. I have a bomb.”

This was a note given by a bank robber to a the cashier at Bank of the West on 6 July 2014.

But this bank robber wasn’t?a sturdy man wearing a ski mask or wielding a machine gun, she was a 25-year old Sikh nurse. Called the Bombshell Bandit, due to her?glamorous disguises and bomb threats, she captured the attention of many who?wondered what could be the reason behind?a?nurse becoming a bank robber.

Sandeep Kaur??moved to California from Punjab at the age of seven and by 19 was a licensed nurse, earning up to $6,000 a month. But things?turned awry when Kaur discovered Las Vegas at 21 and?became a gambling addict.

Soon she quit nursing to concentrate on gambling fulltime. “I stopped working. I could not focus and going to work for this little amount of money? Kaur said.

But by?March 2012 she had lost her?life savings and was in debt. She then borrowed money at a steep interest, attempting to recover what she had lost.

What happened next is best summed by Kaur’s?statement:

“I ate at that table. I only took bathroom breaks? I was sitting at the table for 16 hours… hoping it’ll all change. Then it all just went down the drain.”

She had to flee?Las Vegas and managed to evade the loan sharks until they caught up with her in May 2014.

Desperate, she resorted to their suggestion of a bank robbery and without a weapon or back-up plan, she managed to?escape with $21,200 on her first attempt. But since that wasn’t enough, she had little choice but to rob more banks.

However, her run ended?on 31 July 2014 when the manager of?US Bank alerted the authorities and thus began the police pursuit that lasted 65 miles, crossed three states, two time zones, and reached speeds of 130mph resulting in her capture.

Kaur may be in prison now, but her exploits have cemented?her name on the list of unusual bank robbers.

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