Cannabis

Government to decriminalise drugs

The government looks set to decriminalise all drug possession and use. Except they’re not. According to the government.

The Government says its bill to make drug use a health issue is not default decriminalisation, even though a select committee was told today that prosecutions for drug use or possession will seldom if ever be brought under the bill.
[…] The Misuse of Drugs Amendment Bill, currently before the committee, is the Government’s response to the synthetic cannabis crisis and would classify synthetic drugs AMB-FUBINACA and 5F-ADB as Class A drugs; dealers of Class A drugs face a lifetime in prison.

It would also codify police discretion into law, clarifying that a prosecution for drug use or possession – regardless of which drug – should only be pursued if it was in the public interest, taking into account whether a “health-centred or therapeutic approach would be more beneficial”.

A newspaper

This is the important bit of the proposed amendment. What the relevant clause does is basically decriminalise the possession of all drugs and decriminalise the possession and distribution of cannabis. quote.

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Actually Kate, many of us agree with you.

Kate Hawkesby decides to spread a bit of fear, uncertainty, and doubt regarding the up coming cannabis referendum. Ironically, many on the ?Yes? side actually agree with the points she makes. quote.

Quote:As we edge ever closer to our referendum next year on cannabis, the debate’s heating up.

[?]But part of living in a democratic society is being able to look at debate from all sides. At the moment with the legalise cannabis debate, I tend to come at it from my standpoint as a parent.End of quote.

Agreed. And unlike the MSM, here at Whaleoil you will find intelligent debate and respectful commentary on all sides of the issue. quote.

Quote:But one angle which pricked [sic] my interest this week was that of its move into the hands of big corporates – and with that, it’s increased potency.

If we look to overseas examples, which we should, a Colorado native and author of the book “Weed, Inc”, Ben Cort has been shedding some light on what’s happened in his hometown.

Colorado legalised cannabis in 2012. Since then, commercial interests have taken over sales and they’re making millions.End of quote.

Um, wasn?t Family First NZ saying just a short while ago that the ?promised? cannabis profits hadn?t materialised? But I digress. quote

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Are Kids really allowed to use weed in Colorado schools?


I have to admit that when I first saw the report in Vice I thought ?Are you crazy? Giving weed to kids? This is exactly the kind of thing we?re trying to avoid!? After a closer reading, it turns out that it makes good sense. quote.

Quote:The federal government and human Keebler elf Jeff Sessions may still consider weed a Schedule I drug that’s “only slightly less awful” than heroin, but there’s a huge amount of research to prove otherwise. Medical marijuana has been effective in the treatment of everything from Alzheimer’s to chronic pain to seizures, and it’s even showing promise for people living with HIV.

Colorado has been pushing to destigmatize weed since it legalized recreational marijuana back in 2012, and now, the state has taken another massive step toward embracing cannabis’s medical benefits?by allowing children to take medical marijuana at school.End of quote.

Holy spliff batman! Does that mean kids can smoke weed in school in Colorado? Not so fast, Robin.

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Great. Now 11 year olds are smoking the stuff


A left-wing newspaper reports on 11-year-olds doing synthetics. quote.

Quote:Children as young as 11 are getting hooked on synthetic cannabis in a Napier suburb known for being a popular source of the drug.End of quote.

11 years old. How the Nicky Hager did we get here?

Before I answer that I’d like to start by clearing one thing up. Synthetic cannabis isn’t just a label. Synthetic cannabis is synthetic cannabis. It works on the brain the same way as normal cannabis. It just can be more potent. Some of it, a lot more potent.

So how did we get here? Let’s start with the closest link. The fact that there are pushers selling drugs to kids. If I had my way there’d be a special place in Dante’s hell for scumbags who push illegal drugs and there’d be a special place in that place for those scumbags who push drugs to kids.

Thing is, under the law, there’s no difference between pushing drugs to adults and pushing drugs to kids. Same max penalty. That’s outrageous. Whether you’re a pothead or someone who thinks caffeine should be illegal you have to agree with that.

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Senior criminology lecturer says ‘free the weed’

 

Dr Fiona Hutton, a senior lecturer in criminology, talks some sense on drug-law reform😕Quote:

QuoI started 2018 with an unmistakable sense of optimism ? after years of procrastinating and avoiding the evidence, a government was going to hold a referendum on legalising cannabis by 2020.

Could this be the beginning of an exciting new era of drug policy and drug law reform? Where policy was evidence based, where the harms from drug use could be effectively addressed, and where the damage from criminalisation could be stopped?

[…]My biggest fear is that the whole thing will end up being a rushed, misinformed, ill-thought-through debacle, and we will have missed a really important chance to make a difference; to respond to drug use and drug users differently and more effectively; to stop the harms related to underground markets and criminalisation. Prohibition of drugs has not stopped people using or having problems with them.

[…]I hope the powers that be will take action very soon to provide a balanced, well-produced, well-thought-out information campaign, to ensure New Zealanders are fully aware of what they are voting for.End of quote.

What will happen is that those for reform will provide reasoned, evidence-based arguments while those opposed will engage in lies, misinformation and emotion. This is because those opposed to reform have got nothing. Quote.

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Fact: Legalising weed means fewer teens using it

Following legalization, the rate of adolescent marijuana use in Colorado has fallen to its lowest level in nearly a decade, according to new federal survey data.

State-level numbers from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health show that a little more than 9 percent of Colorado teens age 12 to 17 used marijuana monthly in 2015 and 2016, a statistically significant drop from the prior period. That’s the lowest rate of monthly marijuana use in the state since 2007 and 2008.

Wait. Wasn’t teen use meant to skyrocket after cannabis was legalised?

And it’s not just marijuana: Rates of teen alcohol, tobacco and heroin use are down sharply in the state, as well.

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Government takes teeny, tiny, step towards cannabis reform

It’s a start, nowhere near good enough but it is at least a start on cannabis reform.

The Government will announce tomorrow that it is removing a significant hurdle to getting access to medicinal cannabis in New Zealand.

It is understood doctors will be given the right to approve patients’ requests for cannabis products, rather than Government ministers.

Health Minister Jonathan Coleman strongly hinted at the change today. ? Read more »

A policy from the Greens I can agree with

There is a distinct possibility that this policy from the Greens may actually be implemented if Bill English proves as inept as I believe he will be.

It will allow a Labour/Greens government and with that comes this new policy from the Greens:

The Green Party say it?will legalise cannabis if it?forms a government next year.

Under its?proposal,?people would be able to legally?grow and possess marijuana for personal use.

The?Green Party would also urgently amend the law so?sick?people using medicinal marijuana were not penalised.

The party’s new?Drug Law Reform Policy released on Friday outlined plans to?overhaul existing drug laws in what it said was an inevitable push toward cannabis?legalisation.

I think eventually we’ll follow in the footsteps of USA?and?Canada,” Green Party?health spokesperson Julie Anne?Genter?said. ? Read more »

Britain now looking at legalisation of cannabis

The whole world is moving towards decriminalisation of cannabis, the latest to start the move is the United Kingdom:

Cannabis?should be legalised to bring Britain up to speed with a growing number of Western countries and end the “embarrassment” of domestic drugs policy, a cross party group of MPs have said.

Former deputy prime minster Nick Clegg and former health minister Norman Lamb joined Labour and Tory figures to back a new report which claimed legalisation could net the Treasury more than ?1 billion a year in tax revenue.

The Adam Smith Institute and Volteface study argued that the UK should follow the lead of the United States, where four further states legalised marijuana in this month’s elections.

It came as Germany gets ready to legalise?cannabis?for medical purposes and Canada prepares for all-out decriminalisation.

The Netherlands effectively decriminalised?cannabis?decades ago while Portugal legalised it in 2001. ? Read more »

Three more states voted to legalise cannabis

The news that three more states, California, Nevada and Massachusetts, all voted to legalise cannabis kind of slipped under the radar as Donald Trump surged victory.

For many years now, the American people have been fighting for the widespread legalization of marijuana. While at times it appeared as though they were fighting a losing battle ? thanks to the ridiculous fact that the federal government refuses to acknowledge the truth ? the freedom-loving members of the American public never gave an inch to the opposition, and now their commitment is paying off.

Last night, America got a whole lot greater, and that has nothing to do with the presidential election (we can discuss that at another time). No, how America got a whole lot greater last night has nothing to do with the presidency, and everything to do with the fact that the recreational use of cannabis was legalized in three more states across the country.

Residents of California, Nevada and Massachusetts will now be able to use cannabis as they see fit ? for recreational or medicinal purposes ? without the fear of being unreasonably imprisoned. Anyone who has been paying attention and knows anything about politics or marijuana knows that the only reason this was happening is because the federal government profits off Big Pharma, which loses money every time someone wakes up to the fact that marijuana provides a natural alternative to their chemical-ridden pills. ?? Read more »

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