Mexico City

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These Serial Killer Sisters Murdered So Many People They Broke A World Record. Like so many murderers, the Gonz?lez sisters’ crimes were exposed after police picked up one of their relatives on a routine bust. They suspected the relative, Josefina Gonz?lez, was involved in the kidnapping of a local girl, and upon interrogation, Josefina unravelled a horrific story about what is now known as the “bordello from hell.”

The “Bordello from Hell”

Busting The Gonz?lez Sisters

In the 1950s and 1960s, Delfina and Mar?a de Jes?s Gonz?lez ran a large-scale prostitution ring in Northern Mexico. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the sisters also partook in a massive killing spree?targeting prostitutes, wealthy men, and illegitimate babies.

Delfina and Mar?a de Jes?s Gonz?lez were born into poverty in El Salto de Juanacatlan, Jalisco. Their father, Isidro Torres, was abusive and expected his children to follow a rigid set of rules; ironically, he was also part of the local grass-roots police force that patrolled the remote area of Mexico on horseback. It wasn’t unheard of for the head of the Gonz?lez house to shoot innocent people during arguments or abuse his power, and he often locked the sisters in jail as punishment for wearing sexy clothing or makeup.

The Gonz?lez sisters (known as “Las Poquianchis”) were two sisters from the Mexican state of Guanajuato, located 200 miles north of Mexico City. From the 1950s until the mid-1960s the sisters ran Rancho El ?ngel, called the “bordello from hell” in San Francisco del Rinc?n.

Like so many murderers, the Gonz?lez sisters’ crimes were exposed after police picked up one of their relatives on a routine bust. They suspected the relative, Josefina Gonz?lez, was involved in the kidnapping of a local girl, and upon interrogation, Josefina unraveled a horrific story about what is now known as the “bordello from hell.”

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Is this what Len Brown wants for his 39,000 new houses?

This could be what Len Brown is trying to build in the next three years:

housing-development-mexico_66700_990x742

The photographer comments:

A few years ago when I was working as a helicopter pilot for a local radio station, we were required to fly around all of Mexico City chasing news and traffic. I remember flying up to the highway that connects Mexico City with the neighboring state of Puebla, and on my way back this housing complex that seemed to go on forever caught my attention. I decided to circle around to observe from up close what I later found out was the recently built San Buenaventura complex, which is located in Ixtapaluca, on the eastern outskirts of Mexico City.

The exceptional afternoon sun reflecting those thousands of recently painted small homes just looked so beautiful, and the lower I flew the better the angle, so I just got out my camera, opened the sliding window on my Bell helicopter, and snapped a couple of shots. ?Oscar Ruiz

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