nurses

Photo of the Day

The eight nurses killed by Richard Speck on July 14, 1966, in Chicago were, top from left, Gloria Davy, Suzanne Farris, Merlita Gargullo and Mary Ann Jordan. Bottom row from left are Patricia Matusek, Valentina Pasion, Nina Jo Schmale and Pamela Wilkening.

Eight Honour Nurses Slain?in 1966

A couple of days after his basement flooded, John Schmale finally mustered the energy to head downstairs and investigated the damage.

In the basement’s dim overhead light, a big, brown cardboard box caught his eye, a box so soggy its bottom was ready to fall out. He lugged it upstairs. He opened it.

Inside sat four square, off-white boxes labelled “Kodak,” and on top of them lay a sheet of thin pink paper. He instantly recognised his mother’s cursive handwriting.

With a rush of excitement and a pang of dread, he read her pencilled note: “Nina South Chicago Hospital.”

Nina. His little sister. One of eight young nurses killed in a Chicago townhouse on July 14, 1966, by a man who became notorious: Richard Speck.

“I don’t believe this,” Schmale said to his wife on that day half a century later, gazing inside the box. “What do I have here?”

What he had, in this mysterious box he had inherited when his father died, were four carousels of slides, many of them corroded, warped, mouldy, ravaged by water and time. He unearthed his ancient 35 mm slide projector, marvelled that the bulb still worked and began projecting images on a wall.

There, next to his kitchen near the village of Mahomet, 140 miles south of Chicago, the lost women flickered back to life.

Clicking from slide to slide, Schmale stepped into his sister’s vanished world. It was a world of hair curlers, hair spray cans, ashtrays, manual typewriters, textbooks, sheath dresses, corsages, cluttered rooms, a place where young women laughed, hugged, studied, ate, teased each other’s hair.

He couldn’t identify everyone he saw, but at the photo of the familiar woman in the familiar yellow two-piece bathing suit, he felt his heart clench.

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Photo of the Day

Halifax Explosion. Tall cloud of smoke rising over the water. This is one of the few photographs of the blast, reportedly taken 15-20 seconds after the explosion.

Halifax Explosion. Tall cloud of smoke rising over the water. This is one of the few photographs of the blast, reportedly taken 15-20 seconds after the explosion.

?The Explosion

A Second of Silence, Then in the Blink of an Eye?

On December 6, 1917, the town of Halifax (Nova Scotia, Canada) was destroyed by the explosion of a cargo ship loaded with military explosives. About two thousand people were killed and almost ten thousands were injured. Until the first nuclear blast, it was the largest man-made explosion in recorded history with an equivalent force of 2.9 kilotons of TNT.

??Hold up the train. Ammunition Ship Afire in Harbour Making for Pier 6 and will Explode. Guess this will be My Last Message. Goodbye Boys.?

Final Communication from Railway Dispatcher Patrick Vincent Coleman

At 9:04:35?Mont-Blanc?exploded with a force stronger than any manmade explosion before it.

The steel hull burst sky-high, falling in a blizzard of red-hot, twisted projectiles on Dartmouth and Halifax.

Some pieces were tiny; others were huge. Part of the anchor hit the ground more than 4 kilometers away on the far side of Northwest Arm. A gun barrel landed in Dartmouth more than 5 kilometers from the harbour.

The explosion sent a white cloud billowing 20,000 feet above the city.

For almost two square kilometers around Pier 6, nothing was left standing. The blast obliterated most of Richmond: its homes, apartments and even the towering sugar refinery. On the Dartmouth side, Tuft’s Cove took the brunt of the blast. The small settlement of Turtle Grove was obliterated.

More than 1600 people were killed outright; hundreds more would die in the hours and days to come. Nine thousand people, many of whom might have been safe if they hadn’t come to watch the fire, were injured by the blast, falling buildings and flying shards of glass.

And it wasn’t over yet.

Within minutes the dazed survivors were awash in water. The blast provoked a tsunami?that washed up as high as 20?meters above the harbour’s high-water mark on the Halifax side.

People who were blown off their feet by the explosion, now hung on for their lives as water rushed over the shoreline, through the dockyard and beyond Campbell Road (now Barrington Street).

The tsunami lifted?Imo?onto the Dartmouth shore. The ship stayed there until spring.

The tsunami created by the explosion swept through the damaged areas, scouring the land and leaving bare mud piled with debris. Fireplaces and furnaces caused fires in other areas, leaving acres of charred wreckage.

By 9:15 a.m. on Thursday, December 6, 1917, a major Canadian city lay in rubble, and most of the undamaged area had no water or heat. All communication was lost with the outside world; the city had no telephone service.

That night, a blizzard hit the region, bringing gale force winds and temperatures of 10-15 F. Thick, wet snow soon hid the victims, hindered the rescuers, and halted relief trains; by morning, ice coated the streets and hills.

The Halifax Explosion was the largest man-made explosion until the first atomic bomb was detonated over Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945.

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Public servants are leaving Auckland in droves, but nobody dares speak the real reason

One of the many unfortunate consequences of Auckland’s grossly over-priced housing is the barrier it presents to people moving to the city.

New Zealanders in other parts of the country have to lower their sights considerably to sell their house and buy one in Auckland.

Conversely, Aucklanders will be wary of moving to another centre unless they can afford to keep their Auckland property.

There is logic, therefore, in a proposal from Auckland school principals, which we reported last Sunday, to pay teachers a premium to work in the city.

A survey of 157 principals found a third were confident they could make appropriate appointments to vacancies in their schools.

The reason was not just the difficulty of finding enough teachers willing to move to Auckland but of keeping those who were here.

Those saving for a house could buy one much sooner if they moved out of Auckland.

If they owned a modest house in Auckland it was tempting to sell up and buy something better in a smaller town for the same price. In three of the surveyed primary schools, there were no less than 28 vacancies at the start of this month to replace teachers who had resigned.

The highest turnover is in schools in Auckland’s areas of highest wealth and half those who resigned had left the city. Read more »

Another David Cunliffe social media #FAIL

Some of the yet-to-be-released Labour Party policy must include where they plan to reclassify police and nurses as part of the manufacturing sector.

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total-disarray

Photo Of The Day

Photograph: Arthur Mole and John Thomas

Photograph: Arthur Mole and John Thomas

Art of Living Photographs

 

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