strychnine

Photo of the Day

Saddleworth Moor, where the body was found on 12 December 2015. Photograph: Gary Calton for the Guardian

Saddleworth Moor, where the body was found on 12 December 2015. Photograph: Gary Calton

The Mystery Body Found on Saddleworth Moor

He mightn?t have known where he was going, but he was going on a journey, and he didn?t want anyone to find him

This is the tale of a man found dead in Saddleworth Moor, in Peak District National Park in Northern England, December, 2015. A cyclist found him in a peculiar position, in clothing inappropriate for a walk, and with no belongings or forms of identification.

Months later, after tracing his final route across England from London to Manchester with CCTV footage, and examining the few clues the man left behind ? including a small container holding strychnine, a poison ? detectives have been unable to identify him, or figure out why he traveled 200 miles to die on the moor.

Why did the man travel all the way to the moorland track where he was found? Why there? Why poison? Why strychnine?

Some count the area where the body was discovered as being part of Saddleworth Moor.

It is very popular, especially on a bright summer?s day. Not only walkers but cyclists and climbers come here, and sailors on Dovestone Reservoir.

But it is also a place associated with a number of deaths over the years.

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Looks legit ... A condition known as female hysteria was treated by doctors using a vaginal massage which was later improved on with the invention of the vibrator.

Looks legit … A condition known as female hysteria was treated by doctors using a vaginal massage which was later improved on with the invention of the vibrator.

Historical Beliefs and Practices

I?m fascinated by vintage medicines, cure alls and lifestyle… ?And not just because they often did more harm than good. It?s the idea that anyone could be a snake-oil salesman, and that charisma, charm, and coming up with a good claim were once more important to a medicine?s commercial success than actual medical knowledge.

It is amazing how much the human perspective has changed in the last hundred or so years. Before the expansion of modern medicine and psychiatric care, people were exposed to brutal procedures and morbid beliefs. In the last 500 years, many strange political ideals have been adopted all over the world. In many countries they still are.

Government officials have enacted shocking policies and medical procedures. We can now look back upon some of these moments and wonder what exactly our ancestors were thinking? Many of these ideas were developed in a time when racial and female segregation was a problem, and the accepted social behaviour was different from what we experience today.

Female hysteria was a once-common medical diagnosis, found exclusively in women, which is today no longer recognized as a disorder. The diagnosis and treatment of female hysteria was routine for hundreds of years in Western Europe and America. The disorder was widely discussed in the medical literature of the Victorian era (1837-1901). In 1859, a physician was noted for claiming that a quarter of all women suffered from hysteria. One American doctor cataloged 75 pages of possible symptoms of the condition, and called the list incomplete. According to the document, almost any ailment could fit the diagnosis for female hysteria. Physicians thought that the stresses associated with modern life caused civilized women to be more susceptible to nervous disorders, and to develop faulty reproductive tracts.

Read more »

×