victims

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Dr. James C. Burt’s infamous “Love Surgeries” were anything but kind. ? ACHIM SASS/WESTEND61/CORBIS

This is Not a Love Surgery

?Warning this story may make you feel uncomfortable.

James Caird Burt is a former American gynaecologist who was sometimes nicknamed the “Love Surgeon.”

One of his patients recalled: ?after he delivered my baby, I did not wake up for 2? days, and he kept me hospitalized for a week. I asked him, ?What have you done to me?? Burt said, ?Oh, I just patched you up,? ? He told me by fixing me like he did, it would be just like being a virgin again.?

Dr Burt was a simple gynaecologist with a simple goal: to make life better for the husbands of women who just had their love-holes ruined by childbirth. And so, for more than 20 years starting in the mid-1960’s, Dr Burt would perform vagina-tightening surgery on his new mom patients without their consent. He called it “Love Surgery.” Burt’s “Love Surgery” was based on the doctor’s cockamamie idea that women are “structurally inadequate for intercourse” and that the only way to fix their “pathological condition” was through surgery that made the vagina and vulva more penis friendly.

Burt admitted that many of the women who first received the surgery were simply told after childbirth that they’d received episiotomies. Burt’s book says that “hundreds and hundreds” of women were treated this way, but other sources estimate that the number is actually in the thousands.

After practising for two decades while based in Dayton, Ohio, Burt was sued by female patients for altering their vulvas without their informed consent. Over 20 years, the ambitious doctor reportedly performed surgery on thousands of women, realigning the vagina and removing the skin from around the clitoris, leaving it exposed.

Burt boasted in a self-published 1975 book that the resulting improvements on nature would transform a woman from ?a scared, reluctant little house mouse? to ?a horny little house mouse.?

Far from turning them into orgasmic athletes, say his alleged victims, Burt?s surgery left them sexual cripples, suffering from a host of disabling problems.

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The eight nurses killed by Richard Speck on July 14, 1966, in Chicago were, top from left, Gloria Davy, Suzanne Farris, Merlita Gargullo and Mary Ann Jordan. Bottom row from left are Patricia Matusek, Valentina Pasion, Nina Jo Schmale and Pamela Wilkening.

Eight Honour Nurses Slain?in 1966

A couple of days after his basement flooded, John Schmale finally mustered the energy to head downstairs and investigated the damage.

In the basement’s dim overhead light, a big, brown cardboard box caught his eye, a box so soggy its bottom was ready to fall out. He lugged it upstairs. He opened it.

Inside sat four square, off-white boxes labelled “Kodak,” and on top of them lay a sheet of thin pink paper. He instantly recognised his mother’s cursive handwriting.

With a rush of excitement and a pang of dread, he read her pencilled note: “Nina South Chicago Hospital.”

Nina. His little sister. One of eight young nurses killed in a Chicago townhouse on July 14, 1966, by a man who became notorious: Richard Speck.

“I don’t believe this,” Schmale said to his wife on that day half a century later, gazing inside the box. “What do I have here?”

What he had, in this mysterious box he had inherited when his father died, were four carousels of slides, many of them corroded, warped, mouldy, ravaged by water and time. He unearthed his ancient 35 mm slide projector, marvelled that the bulb still worked and began projecting images on a wall.

There, next to his kitchen near the village of Mahomet, 140 miles south of Chicago, the lost women flickered back to life.

Clicking from slide to slide, Schmale stepped into his sister’s vanished world. It was a world of hair curlers, hair spray cans, ashtrays, manual typewriters, textbooks, sheath dresses, corsages, cluttered rooms, a place where young women laughed, hugged, studied, ate, teased each other’s hair.

He couldn’t identify everyone he saw, but at the photo of the familiar woman in the familiar yellow two-piece bathing suit, he felt his heart clench.

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Kaytn massacre: This 1952 photo, shows a view of a partially emptied mass grave in the Katyn forest where approximately 22,000 Polish men were killed. Declassified documents add proof that the U.S. government helped cover up the Soviets’ responsibility.

The Hill of Goats

?Impossible to tell when I will return home..

Katyn Forest is a wooded area near Gneizdovo village, a short distance from Smolensk in Russia where, in 1940 on Stalin’s orders, the NKVD shot, and buried over 4000 Polish service personnel that had been taken prisoner when the Soviet Union invaded Poland in September 1939 in WW2 in support of the Nazis.

In 1943 the Nazis exhumed the Polish dead and blamed the Soviets. In 1944, having retaken the Katyn area from the Nazis, the Soviets exhumed the Polish dead again and blamed the Nazis. The rest of the world took its usual sides in such arguments.

In 1989, with the collapse of Soviet Power, Premier Gorbachev finally admitted that the Soviet NKVD had executed the Poles, and confirmed two other burial sites similar to the site at Katyn. Stalin’s order of March 1940 to execute by shooting some 25,700 Poles, including those found at the three sites, was also disclosed with the collapse of Soviet Power. This particular second world war slaughter of Poles is often referred to as the “Katyn Massacre” or the “Katyn Forest Massacre”.

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After dropping out of college in Washington, Bundy travelled around the country working odd end jobs. He eventually settled down in Seattle for a while to attend the University of Washington and take a job at Seattle's Suicide Hotline crisis center. Bundy would later enroll in law school in 1974 and begin a career in politics before things started to go downhill. During this time, Bundy claimed to have made his first kill in 1971 while in Seattle.

After dropping out of college in Washington, Ted Bundy travelled around the country working odd end jobs. He eventually settled down in Seattle for a while to attend the University of Washington and take a job at Seattle’s Suicide Hotline crisis center. Bundy would later enroll in law school in 1974 and begin a career in politics before things started to go downhill. During this time, Bundy claimed to have made his first kill in 1971 while in Seattle.

Notorious Serial Killer

A serial killer is defined as someone who kills three or more people over a long period of time. They are usually male and possess a “mask of sanity,” which means that on the surface, they appear to be normal law-abiding citizens with a pleasant demeanour. However, beneath their facade serial killers are sociopaths who lack the capability to empathize with the suffering of their victims.

Ted Bundy was a good-looking guy, and seemed very friendly and charismatic. However, behind his handsome face lurked the twisted mind of a serial killer, and between the years of 1974 and 1978 Bundy kidnapped and murdered 30 young women in the U.S. Those were just the women we know of; experts agree that he could have been responsible for up to forty disappearances and murders to which he didn’t confess.

To lure in his victims, Bundy would often pretend to be disabled or would pose as an authority figure. Other times, he would simply break into his victim’s homes and bludgeon them to death as they slept. After killing them, he would rape, torture, and dismember them, often keeping souvenirs (like their heads) in his apartments for months at a time.
After a thrilling police chase, Bundy was finally arrested and brought to justice in 1979 and was killed in the electric chair in January 1989, in Starke, Florida.

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She didn’t show solidarity with the gay community, she showed it with Islam

I have had it up to here with our representatives showing solidarity with the side of oppression rather than the victims. The ignorance expressed is gob smacking. Susan Devoy has shown herself to be devoid of any rational thought. Is she really this ignorant or is it deliberate?

The headline for the article about Susan Devoy says that?NZ politicians need to be as brave as migrant children. I totally agree. They need to have the courage to look at the indisputable evidence and act to protect our gay community, our Christian community, our Jewish community, our women and our children from an ideology that is clearly extremely dangerous to them. If she wants to talk about bravery, let’s talk about the Christians who are not safe inside UN-run refugee camps because of how Muslim refugees threaten, hurt, rape and kill them. If she wants to talk about bravery then let’s talk about the people speaking out against Islam who live with constant death threats, and the cartoonists who were slaughtered for offending the religion of I will blow you all to pieces peace.

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Photo Of The Day

Molly LaRue and Geoff Hood in Duncannon, Pennsylvania, on September 12, 1990, with Cove Mountain in the background. Photo: Courtesy of Bob Howell

Molly LaRue and Geoff Hood in Duncannon, Pennsylvania, on September 12, 1990, with Cove Mountain in the background. Photo: Courtesy of Bob Howell

Murder on the Appalachian Trail

Twenty-six years ago, a grisly double homicide on America?s most famous hiking route shocked the nation and forever changed their?ideas about crime, violence, and safety in the outdoors.

They were known to hikers as Nalgene and Cleavis.

They were two young lovers engaged to be married who were sharing an adventure down the Appalachian Trail until they crossed paths with Paul David Crews.

Molly LaRue and Geoffrey Logan Hood had camped for the night in a wooden lean-to known as the Thelma Marks Shelter a few miles outside Duncannon. The three-sided structure was nestled among birch, poplar and oak trees on the south side of Cove Mountain about 30 feet below the trail that runs from Maine to Georgia.

?They were caught off-guard and somebody attacked them … sometime before dawn,? Perry County Coroner Michael Shalonis told reporters after the bodies were found on Sept. 13, 1990.

?It is a quiet, restorative place, this clearing high on a Pennsylvania ridge. Ferns and wildflowers carpet its floor. Sassafras and tulip trees, tall oak and hickory stand tight at its sides, their leaves hissing in breezes that sweep from the valley below. Cloistered from civilization by a steep 900-foot climb over loose and jutting rock, the glade goes unseen by most everyone but a straggle of hikers on the Appalachian Trail, the 2,180-mile footpath carved into the roofs of 14 eastern states.

Those travellers have rested here for more than half a century. At the clearing?s edge stands an open-faced shelter of heavy timber, one of 260 huts built roughly a day?s walk apart on the AT?s wriggling, roller-coaster course from Maine to Georgia. It?s tall and airy and skylit, with a deep porch, two tiers of wooden bunks, and a picnic table.

A few feet away stood the ancient log lean-to it replaced. When I visited this past spring, saplings and tangled brier so colonized the old shelter?s footprint that I might have missed it, had I not slept there myself. Twenty-six?summers ago, I pulled into what was called the Thelma Marks shelter, near the halfway point of a southbound through-hike. I met a stranger in the old lean-to, talked with him under its low roof as we fired up our stoves and cooked dinner.

Eight nights later, a southbound couple I?d befriended early in my hike followed me into Thelma Marks. They met a stranger there, too.

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Norman Baker, Holding A Subjects Head, At A Demonstration Of His Hypnosis Treatment, 1900. Born November 27, 1882, in Muscatine, Iowa, Norman Baker, was the last of 10 children delivered to wealthy factory owner John Baker and his wife Frances. Young Norman left school at the age of 16 to work as a machinist in his father's factory. Baker became fascinated, however, by a hypnotist act that he saw as part of a vaudeville show that had traveled to his small, rural town. Baker soon began his own vaudeville act in 1900, called The Madame Pearl Tangley show, where he had a beautiful woman "read" the minds of spectators in the audience.

Norman Baker, Holding A Subjects Head, At A Demonstration Of His Hypnosis Treatment, 1900. Born November 27, 1882, in Muscatine, Iowa, Norman Baker, was the last of 10 children delivered to wealthy factory owner John Baker and his wife Frances. Young Norman left school at the age of 16 to work as a machinist in his father’s factory. Baker became fascinated, however, by a hypnotist act that he saw as part of a vaudeville show that had traveled to his small, rural town. Baker soon began his own vaudeville act in 1900, called The Madame Pearl Tangley show, where he had a beautiful woman “read” the minds of spectators in the audience.

Crescent Hotel History

?Norman Baker Struck Snake Oil

Norman Baker had worked at a myriad of careers?magician, inventor, radio evangelist?in his lifetime, none of which qualified him to be a medical doctor. But this didn’t stop him from opening up a medical practice in his home state of Iowa and later in 1937, when he had been run out of town, in a hotel in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. The Crescent Hotel, where the notorious “Doctor” Baker treated his patients and promised to cure them of cancer, still exists after all these years. Most of Dr. Baker’s patients, however, barely lasted a few weeks under his care…

Perched on the crest of West Mountain above the Victorian village of Eureka Springs, Arkansas is the historic 1886 Crescent Hotel & Spa. The 78-room resort hotel is not only known as one of America?s most distinctive and historic destinations, but it is also renowned for a bevy of spirits that are said to continue to walk upon the palatial grounds.

Built by the Eureka Springs Improvement Company and the Frisco Railroad, the hotel was designed by Isaac L. Taylor, a well-known Missouri architect who had designed a number of famous buildings in St. Louis. Twenty-seven acres at the north end of West Mountain was chosen for its majestic location overlooking the valley.

It was an important time in Eureka Springs’ history as the “healing waters? of the Ozarks had become well known across the nation. People from near and far were swarming to the area in hopes of curing their ailments and easing their pains. The developers of the Crescent Hotel & Spa planned to take advantage of these many travelers by building the most luxurious resort in the country.

Powell Clayton, a former governor of Arkansas from 1868 to 1870, formed the Eureka Springs Improvement Company in hopes of taking advantage of this prosperous period. Along with a number of other investors, the Frisco Railroad joined in on the plan, knowing that the resort could only spur their business.

Numerous stonemasons were brought in from Ireland to begin the construction in 1884. Due to the density of the magnesium limestone used to build the hotel, special wagons were constructed to move the massive pieces of stone from the quarry site on the White River. Designed in an eclectic array of architectural styles, the masons built 18 inch walls, a number of towers, overhanging balconies, and a massive stone fireplace in the lobby.

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Two cartoons, two Maori victims but only one complaint to the HRC

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

Why is BoomSlang’s cartoon called racist when this cartoon by Murdoch is being re tweeted all over twitter? Both cartoons have an image of a Maori who has suffered violent abuse.Both Maori are portrayed as victims. BoomSlang’s cartoon referred to a specific story in the news and a specific victim while this cartoon generalises about ALL Maori.

Both cartoons make powerful points about things we know to be true based on statistics.So why has no complaint been made to the Human Rights Commision?about this cartoon?

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Pictured, officers working the Phantom Killer case in 1946 gathered in the Miller County Sheriff's office. Law enforcement officers believed they once caught the hooded killer behind a murder spree in Texarkana that left five people dead in 1946, but the suspect got off on a technicality. The case remains unsolved.

Pictured, officers working the Phantom Killer case in 1946 gathered in the Miller County Sheriff’s office. Law enforcement officers believed they once caught the hooded killer behind a murder spree in Texarkana that left five people dead in 1946, but the suspect got off on a technicality. The case remains unsolved.

The Town That Dreaded Sundown

Terror In Texarkana?Twilight

Silvery, Cold Moonlight and Night Conspire To Create an Eerie Sense of Foreboding and Terror.

For the night stalkers of the world ? the serial killers, the sexual predators ? a moonlit night provides just enough illumination to see the prey, but not so much light that the victim can easily identify the assailant.

Presuming the victim remains alive, of course.

Texarkana was a throwback village in the mid?20th?Century. The town not only straddled two state lines (Texas and Arkansas) it also straddled two distinct states of mind: the wild, lawless Texan and the hillbilly fussin? of Arkansawyers.

Taxarkana .. The enduring legend began not with death, but with a frightening and vicious attack on two young lovers who managed to survive.

On a February night in 1946, 24-year-old Jimmy Hollis and his girlfriend Mary Jeanne Larey, 19, had attended a downtown movie, then decided to prolong the evening with a romantic visit to a secluded lane on the edge of town. They had, according to the story the young woman would later tell authorities, been parked no more than 10 minutes, when a man, his face hidden beneath a white hood, approached the car, pointing a flashlight and pistol at them.

She would recall the assailant telling her boyfriend, “I don’t want to kill you, fella, so do what I say.” He then ordered both of them out of the car, angrily demanding that Hollis remove his trousers. Then, with the young man clad only in his boxer shorts, the attacker hit him twice in the head, knocking him unconscious. When Larey tearfully tried to convince the gunman that they had no money, even pulling a billfold from her date’s discarded pants to show him, she, too, was struck in the head. Bleeding and dazed, her screams echoed through the woods as the man then sexually assaulted her with the barrel of his gun.

It was when Hollis began to regain consciousness that her attacker’s attention was diverted long enough for the young woman to get to her feet and run. The intruder quickly caught up to her and hit her in the head again. “I remember looking up at him and saying, ‘Go ahead and kill me,'” she later said. Then, for reasons she would never know, the masked man suddenly turned away and disappeared into the darkness.

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Kiev?s Independence Square in Ukraine

Kiev?s Independence Square in Ukraine

Before & After: Kiev?s Independence Square in Ukraine Read more »

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